Stationary Belt Sander

This jig holds your belt sander upside down for sanding of handheld project parts. Each sander has a different shape, so custom-cut the plywood sides.

The Family Handyman

This jig firmly holds your belt sander upside down for easier sanding of handheld project parts. Each sander has a different shape, so custom-cut the plywood sides with a jigsaw to fit yours. Work for a tight fit so the sander is rock steady while youre working. Use clamps to hold small pieces and dont wear loose clothing. Many thanks to reader Scott Miller for this tip.

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Hints for building:

To trace the pattern for the sides, unscrew any removable housing pieces and lay them flat side down to trace their shape on the plywood.

On many sanders, the shape of the motor housing is the same on both sides. Cut this shape on one plywood side, then trace the first cutout shape on the other plywood side.

Level the sander before screwing ends on the sides. Set the sides edgewise on a flat surface, fit the sander in the sides and check that the sanding belt is parallel to the base. Trim a little off the bottom edge of one side if its not parallel. Note: You may need to add a retaining strap or two to secure the sander if you have a different configuration.

Cut a trigger notch in the sides so you can turn the sander on and off without removing it from the jig.

Plus: Everything you need to know about belt sanders.