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10 Unusual Landscape Borders

Draw interest in your garden with these unique landscaping borders. Many are repurposed materials, which means money savings, too!

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Glass Bottles

Glass bottles are great items to use for a landscaping border because it’s easy and inexpensive to accumulate a lot of them. You can vary the size and colors of the bottles and they will look pretty as the sun shines through them. Wet the ground a little before installation, then dig a trench about six inches deep. Place the bottles upside down and pack the dirt around them firmly. Leave about two to three inches of the bottles exposed. For the best garden edging tips check these out.

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Terra Cotta Pots

Terra cotta pots are available everywhere, new or used, which is why they make a great a landscape border. First, decide if you’ll want the pots to be upside down or placed on their side. Then dig a trench along the border and arrange the pots the way you prefer. Like a natural look? Here’s how to create a simple trench and mulch border.

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Clam Shells

For a natural look, clam shells can make for the perfect gardening border. The bleached, neutral shells are a nice contrast to the pops of color from the garden. Bags of shells can be found at most craft stores. Before you start other garden projects see these 12 great landscaping tips that will save you time, money and energy.

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Logs

If you’re looking for landscaping wood borders, try logs. Log garden borders add a rustic touch to residential landscaping. You can change the look of the garden with the type, size and shape of the logs you use. If you have a small garden place the logs vertically, or horizontally if you have a larger space. For more small garden ideas see these 14 landscaping tips.

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Tires

Tires are a great item to upcycle in the garden. They can also be used many different ways to many different garden borders. They can be cut in half and placed along the garden edge, or stack them vertically along the border. Tires also make great planters; it’s an easy project you can finish in one day. For more inspiration check out these 12 ways to use old tires.

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Grapevines

You can repurpose materials from your garden to create this unique garden border. If you don’t have grapevines of your own, they can be purchased at the store. The vines can be cut and tied together to create the look you want. They can also be soaked in water overnight so they can be bent to create a stylish look. To keep gardening inexpensive, see these frugal gardening tips.

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Bamboo

Bamboo borders are a great eco-friendly option for any gardener looking for landscaping wood borders. You can make your own or buy one at the store. Bring more bamboo into your garden with these interesting planters.

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Old Plates

Using old plates is a great way to create a shabby chic landscaping border. If you shop resale, antique and vintage shops you’ll find a variety of plates at affordable prices. You can also have fun playing with the color, shape and size of the plates. When you make the border make sure to put any sharp or broken edges in the ground. This border is so pretty you’ll want to show it off, so check out of these affordable garden paths that can guide people to you garden.

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Scrap Wood

If there are pieces of scrap wood gathering dust in your garage, turn them into a decorative landscaping wood borders. They can be painted any color you like and cut to varying heights. For more low maintenance ideas check out this collection of tips.

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Wheels or Hubcaps

For an interesting detail, add old wheels or hubcaps as a garden border. You can find them at flea markets and antique stores. If you want to remove rust use these detailing tips to make the wheels shine.

Jordan Spence
I currently write for a small daily newspaper in Northern Michigan. Previous to this job I reported at the Petoskey News Review for three years. At this publication I wrote, edited and took most of my own photos.